Viper | Invisible People

Viper


I should warn you this video is hard to watch. Viper has lived on the streets of Hollywood for over six months. Although, like many of those who came through the foster care system, she […]

Viper

I should warn you this video is hard to watch. Viper has lived on the streets of Hollywood for over six months. Although, like many of those who came through the foster care system, she considers herself homeless for her entire life.

Viper faces serious health issues; she has a catheter and uses a service animal since she is prone to seizures. Sadly, her ailments and dog prevent her from being admitted to most homeless shelters.

This is one of those stories that left me feeling helpless. I wish I had more answers.

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  • ihitdrums

    truly is difficult to watch this one. There’s got to be SOMETHING for people with these conditions, right? Is there no shelter that would take in someone with her health problems?

  • http://www.squidoo.com/OnBeingHomeless2 EelKat

    @ihitdrums

    to answer your question “There’s got to be SOMETHING for people with these conditions, right? Is there no shelter that would take in someone with her health problems?”

    No. I know, because I am “in the same boat” Viper is in. It’s been 3 years and I’ve yet to find help.

    Being homeless myself for quite some time, I found out just how badly homeless people are treated by none homeless people, and why so many are not in shelters (the nearest shelter to me was a 5 hour drive by car and I don’t have a car!)

    Part of me liked being homeless, like when I could sleep under the stars on warm nights, listening to the ocean, but most of the time it was sheer hell and I hated it.

    My family of 7 people, 2 dogs, 75+ birds, and 14 cats, became homeless after a flood took away everything we owned and left my dad in a coma. My mom was a stay at home mom, who was disabled, but still took care of us kids.

    My dad’s hospital bills were more than $12,000 per day just for the life support machine that he was on, not including all the tests and treatments besides. In the end his medical bill topped 2 million dollars!

    Without a house to live in anymore and with my dad no longer working because he was in a coma, we ended up homeless and living in a tent-thing made out of a tarp and cinderblocks, and we had to fight off a winter in Maine under that thing. We couldn’t go to a shelter, because my dad (after waking up 2 months later) was disabled, plus my mom was already disabled, plus there were too many minor children in the family, and we had pets. No shelter would take us.

    We were not eligible for any of the state programs that supposedly helped homeless people either.

    Well, when you are homeless, it doesn’t matter what happened or how you became homeless, because just the fact that you are homeless “brands” you as inferior and worthless and sets you up for all sorts of a abuse by “regular” people (non-homeless people). I had no idea people were so mean or that homeless people were being treated so shamelessly until my family became homeless. That was the worst year of my life and I don’t ever want to have to go through anything like that again, and I wish that no one else had to go though it either.

  • Melania

    I’m a little confused as to why a homeless shelter would deny Viper access to services because of the service dog. Isn’t she entitled to these services because of the Americans with Disabilities Act? I no longer live in LA, but I can hope that someone who can help her in the more immediate sense can help her. Please someone needs to check on ADA rules!

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