Reggie | Invisible People

Reggie


There was so much noise on Chicago’s Michigan Avenue Bridge I didn’t notice Reggie was asleep. I felt bad. I should have remembered when I was homeless. Sleep came when I felt safe, or when […]

Reggie

There was so much noise on Chicago’s Michigan Avenue Bridge I didn’t notice Reggie was asleep. I felt bad. I should have remembered when I was homeless. Sleep came when I felt safe, or when I was so exhausted I collapsed. Rarely did sleep happen at night. Rarely did I rest away from people where I would be alone and vulnerable.

The night before Reggie slept on a friends couch. More and more people including families are ‘couch surfing’ as an alternative to literally being on the streets. Just like the growing number in weekly rate hotels our government does not count this as being ‘homeless’. Reggie is lucky his friend is only charging $5 a night. As the economy gets worse I’m hearing more stories of people taking advantage of even their own relatives.

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  • bluefan9

    I would like to commend these brave individuals who have shown such resiliency and courage when faced with the hardships that accompany homelessness. We have to do better in our communities and in our nation and in our world to address this issue. I don't have the answers; I wish I did. I appreciate the reality check that these interviews bring, and encourage this site to continue to get the message out to the world that people who are homeless should not be invisible, but should be taken care of as members of our community, nation, and world.

  • edoneillarbra

    NOTHING NEW: HOMELESS CAMPING IS ILLEGAL

    America's homeless crisis is soon to get worse. According to data from the Labor Department, more jobs have been lost in the past 12 months than any other period since the government began keeping records in 1939. Perhaps most disconcerting is that experts predict unemployment will get worse before the economy gets better. In 1991 and 2001, unemployment didn't hit its peak until two years after those recessions ended. We can no longer close our eyes to the issues of poverty and homelessness. People like Mark Horvath’s http://invisiblepeople.tv/blog/ and Alaska's ARBRA’s http://www.responsiblebev.com/ are giving the illegal homeless campers a face and voice so they are invisible no more. We wants you to remember that the homeless people ignored today were much like a lot of us not very long ago. They're not the stereotype inebriates camped out in the woods around our cities and homes. Their folks that need a leg up from a caring community. Lets push our selves away from the comfort zone, As Mayor Sullivan is asking us to do; go out and talk to these people like Mark and ARBRA volunteers have done for years as caring citizens, businesses and nonprofit agencies of Anchorage. In order to better serve those in need it’s important to know more about the people camped in the shadows and off our neighborhood trails, what are their backgrounds (document each one) and why are they choosing this lifestyle? We also need this information in a timely week-to-week, day-to-day manner so constructive intervention can take place; and not after something bad has happened. For those who are displaced and trying to get back on their feet, It's the same as it's always been, there is not enough low-income housing or shelters available and their won’t be for years to come. For the short term these campers need to have a clean, safe, managed place too camp-out with some basic amenities. They don’t feel safe illegally camped out like unwanted souls with no legal place to go. They are afraid of homeless bashing by young people, women are afraid of being raped by other campers, etc. It’s the same year after year and unfortunately with the economic conditions in Alaska Villages it’s getting worse.

    REAL CHANGE IS NEEDED

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