Edward and Anita | Invisible People

Edward and Anita


“Three months ago I never thought I’d be dumpster diving,” Edward told me right before I sat down. Both him and his wife Anita live homeless in a park in Glendale, California. Edward and Anita […]

Edward and Anita

“Three months ago I never thought I’d be dumpster diving,” Edward told me right before I sat down. Both him and his wife Anita live homeless in a park in Glendale, California.

Edward and Anita used to make a living telephone soliciting, but when work slowed down, they could not afford to pay for the hotel room they were living in. Luckily, at the time, Glendale was operating a winter shelter program. When that program closed, Edward and Anita, and about 80 others, ended up homeless.

Edward and Anita talk about a small community of homeless friends that have banned together to help each other. Anita adds “I get $473 a month from social security and no body can live on $473.”

The boomer generation is now reaching their senior years. This last economic crash destroyed most people’s hope for retirement. The real truth is, we are going to see a lot more older homeless people like Edward and Anita, who even with public assistance, cannot afford adequate housing.

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  • http://www.facebook.com/kenneth.houdek Kenneth Houdek

    Then It is worse than they say.ACTION must be taken!

  • vjcris55

    My heart goes out to you, Edward and Anita! Thank you for sharing your story. I am a 57 year old, laid-off teacher. I am on the streets. A shelter in Glendale, Ascencia, did not accept me because, I had no income! Please take care.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Patricia-Oehler/100002610039844 Patricia Oehler

    What can we do? Awareness is only awareness, it is not helping these folks, they are still homeless. (not trying to dog your concern and your work, but more needs to be done than just documentation of the homeless) As one of the riches counties in the world there should be better accsess to permanent shelter/housing. (question, how much of the funds you raise go to getting these people permanant housing)

  • Morningstar Mccoy

    Not trying to criticize you for what you are doing whatsoever, however I do agree wholeheartedly with Patricia Oehler. How much of the funds you raise go to getting these people permanent housing? Every one have a fund my question is how is it being utilized? IJS

  • http://hardlynormal.com hardlynormal

    Hi Patrica,

    Thanks for your comment. You are spot on more needs to be done, and that awareness is not enough. Invisible People is an awareness and educational campaign that has had real results in changing entire communities to think differently about homelessness. That has to be the first step because without the culture change no one gets housed. We have also seen individual success like Donny getting into housing after 21 years homeless http://invisiblepeople.tv/blog/2011/04/the-power-of-community-donny-is-in-housing-homeless-calgary-canada/

    You ask: how much money goes into getting people into permanent housing? First, we don’t raise much money. We have zero employees because there is no funding. I work a “normal” job and do all this in my spare time. We are not a direct services organization, although when we have money and see a need we will do what we can to help a person.

    We reach millions of new people each year who have never heard of new models to help homelessness. In a non-direct way all of the money raised goes to help people get off the streets and into housing. We are trying to change a broken system to help more people.

    This short video is one example http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oMg9fc_bOpA

    Here is another short video showing real results http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FEvJysGJdcE You’ll find more in the blog section of this site.

    I hope that helps.

    Mark

  • http://hardlynormal.com hardlynormal

    Hi,

    I answered Patricia’s question below. Just to confirm, we don’t raise a lot of money. People do not support the fight against homelessness, especially not education and awareness. I work a “normal” job because we cannot even hire one employee. I do this with a lot of personal and professional sacrifice.

    Again – we are not a direct services nonprofit. We provide education and awareness so communities will change their views on people experiencing homelessness. Without such change, there is little support to get people into housing, so our work is very important.

    I posted some link in Patrica’s response and you can find more info in the blog section of this site.

    Mark

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