Mark | Invisible People

Mark


In 2008, Mark’s wife and daughter died, and shortly after he had a nervous breakdown. Mark then spent seven months in a hospital getting better. Mark then found out that no matter how legitimate a […]

Mark

In 2008, Mark’s wife and daughter died, and shortly after he had a nervous breakdown. Mark then spent seven months in a hospital getting better. Mark then found out that no matter how legitimate a reason, that if you don’t show up to work or pay your bills for several months, you lose everything!

Mark then spent a year homeless. He got a job washing dishes at a deli and worked his way off the streets. Business slowed, and he ended back out on the streets again.

Mark says that this time around he still has faith in himself, but he has lost faith in the system. Mark encourages us all to stand together because he says it’s a human issue not a homeless issue. Mark believes that we all should have the basic essentials of a house and food, and I could not agree more.

Mark is a kind and gentle soul. He is someone who has “slipped through the gaps of the safety net”, and should have never ended up on the streets. Sadly, I hear stories like his often. We must do better in mental heath services and we most certainly need to keep people who are trying to get better from ending up on the streets, where many just get worse!

.

More Stories:

  • http://twitter.com/Lynnier Lynn Riordan

    Great story. Thank you for writing this. Compassion takes a conscious effort to open and expand our hearts. The idea that anyone, or worse, any group, deserve this kind of hardship is false. To see this does call upon us to open our hearts. We can either take the easy route and close ourselves to the suffering of others and ourselves, or we can take the route that requires effort and the courage to feel negative emotions. This courageous route requires developing compassion for ourselves and others.

    Again, thank you!

  • Daniel Hauff

    “You are not here to be loved, comforted, or understood; you are here to love, comfort, and understand.” That was a wise 12-stepper who gave him that advice. I am glad to have stumbled across your website today. We need to flip our world. Most definitely.

  • John Doe

    I saved up money, moved into a cargo van, and even though I make about $400 a week, I am still considered poor.

    I am anything but impoverished!

    I have everything I need, and can even move my mobile dwelling to find another job if needed,

    Having a house or an apartment…is too much for most.

    I will never rent again.

    Been almost a year now…

Switch to our mobile site