Morris


While I was interviewing Jossalyn, I looked over and saw a homeless man on a bicycle in the alley patiently waiting for me to finish. Morris just happened to be riding by and stopped because […]

Morris

While I was interviewing Jossalyn, I looked over and saw a homeless man on a bicycle in the alley patiently waiting for me to finish. Morris just happened to be riding by and stopped because he wanted to share his story of homelessness in Los Angeles!

Morris has been on the streets for over 17 years. He says it’s a dangerous place. Sometimes people experiencing homelessness have to eat things they don’t want to eat. Sometimes people experiencing homelessness have to do things they don’t want to do just to survive. Morris goes on to say that after all the hard living, a person starts to think “that’s life” and begins getting used to homelessness!

Morris shares a very real story of homelessness, but when I ask him about his future, he starts to smile and tells me that he’d like to be a mechanic. Even after all that time on the streets, there is still hope in people’s hearts! Now it’s up to use to give them a helping hand to get off the streets and better their lives! We can end homelessness!

*Watch Jossalyn’s video here.


Angelenos can help end homelessness this March 7th. Vote YES on Measure H to help end homelessness for 45,000 families and individuals across Los Angeles County within the next five years. It will also prevent homelessness for 30,000 families and individuals over the same time period, including women and children, veterans, seniors, foster youth, and survivors of domestic violence. For more more information click here.

Morris shares the real story of homelessness, but when I ask him about his future he smiles. Click To Tweet
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  • Sherry

    Unfortunately both political parties have ignored the homeless for way too long. they don’t always vote. Job raining and a decent place to live is what most want. Sometimes I cry other times I sob for these forgotten people. There are so many in Las Vegas living on the street.

  • I thought I was immune until it happened to me.

  • All I wanted was to return to the life that had rejected (or shall I say ‘ejected?’) me. When I first hit the street, it was because I had slowly burned through my emergency reserve of capital: I still had top-flight tech skills, which changes quickly, but there’s usually enough legacy equipment, systems and software to offer a grasp at the bottom rung of the industry. What about the even lower rung outside of the industry? They enjoyed very much laughing at my misfortune because it was their place now to tell me no. What happened to me? Shelters often assumed it must be drugs: I was born clean and have stayed that way. I’m thinking of calling the FBI to see if someone were’t able to hang a fake conviction record on me. There were just too many whispers when I did manage to get an interview; there were just too many occasions when my marketable credentials were ignored altogether. I’m not entertained by the superior attitudes of the people pretending to help me. Give me a menial job, but don’t act like that’s all I can handle or that your education is somehow better than mine. I don’t mean you in particular, but I often encountered that job when I offered a broad array of valuable skills at the price the market would bear or lower — and still got few interviews and no offers. “Falling through the cracks” sounds like something that happens on a Sunday afternoon, but it also happens agonisingly slowly while Olympian levels of effort to hold on go for nought — and you are swallowed by the the abyss screaming that it shouldn’t be happening to you.

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