Elvin

elvin

Elvin is a seasoned healthcare professional. He has worked as a nurse for over 20 years and also holds a degree in political science. He has been married for 25 years and has three children.

Elvin sounds like someone you’d meet at a baseball game or a coffee shop, but I met Elvin in a parking lot in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. He has been homeless and living under a bridge for over a year. He’s working to renew his nursing license so he can go back to work. He says it’s hard to keep your dignity when you’re living on the streets without a home of your own. He is hopeful that his children will learn from his experience.

Homeless can happen to anyone. There was a time when Elvin was on top of the world. Now, he’d give anything to get back to where he once was in life. Even if he is never the man he once was, I hope he can reach a place where he finds happiness and a sense of restored pride.

I think Elvin said it best: “I shouldn’t have to live like this.”

Special thanks to Youth Oasis and Pastor Moore


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Invisible People

           

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