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By Location Alaska Albuquerque Allentown Amsterdam Anaheim Anchorage Ann Arbor Atlanta Austin Baton Rouge Bend Binghamton Boston Boulder Canada Cardiff Charlotte Chatsworth Chicago Chippenham Cleveland Columbia SC Columbus Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Edmonton Eugene Fayetteville Fort McMurray Fredericton Gainesville Glendale Great Falls Greensboro Harbor City Harrisburg Hawaii Hawthorne Hollywood Honolulu houston Ithaca Kalkaska Kelowna Koreatown Las Vegas Lima London London (Canada) Los Angeles Louisville Manchester Miami Minneapolis/St Paul Montreal Nashville New Orleans New York City Nickelsville Norway Oakland Ocala Oslo Ottawa Oxford Paradise Pasadena Peru Philadelphia Phoenix Pine Ridge Pittsburgh Portland Reseda Sacramento Salt Lake City San Diego San Francisco San Jose San Luis Obispo Santa Monica Saskatoon Seattle Shawnee Skid Row Springfield St John's St Louis St. Petersburg Syracuse Tacoma Tampa Toronto Traverse City Tulsa United Kingdom Vancouver Venice Beach Vermont Victoria Wales Washington DC Wentzville Westwood Wichita Wilmington Winnipeg Yellowknife By topic Addiction Advocacy Affordable housing Art and Music Awareness Charity Cold Weather College Students Community Involvement Coronavirus Couch Surfing Couple Criminalization Data Disabled Divorce Domestic violence Drug testing Education Employment Eviction Ex-convict Faith based Families Family conflict Female Financial crisis Foster care Harm reduction Health care HIV/AIDS Homeless count Homeless deaths Hostels (UK shelters) Hotels Housing First HUD Human trafficking Identification Incarceration Indigenous Invisible People Invisible Stories Job loss K2/Spice (Synthetic Marijuana) LGBT Libraries Lived Experience Male Mental illness Mobile Homeless Natural disasters NIMBY Outreach Panhandling Peer Support Pets Poverty Pregnant PTSD Public Feeding Racism Recycling Relationships Research Rural Schools Seniors Sex Offenders Sex Worker Shelters Single Parent Social Media Social Security Socks Solutions Street Soccer Survival sex System Failure Systems Change Technology Tent Cities Tiny Homes Transgender Travelers Veteran Vietnam Veteran Violence Waiting list Welfare Working poor Youth EVENTS @home contests PBS road trip road trip 2009 road trip 2010 road trip 2011 road trip 2013 to fight youth homelessness sober birthday campaign SXSW TEDx INTERVIEWS Learn More Canadian Homelessness Coronavirus and Homelessness Criminalization of Homelessness Family Homelessness Homeless Seniors Homeless Veterans Homeless Youth Homelessness Mobile Homelessness Panhandling Tent Encampments U.K. Homelessness MISCELLANEOUS 360 video Awards Cause Marketing Dream Center Gates Foundation Google Glass Media Patreon Tribute World Trade Center YouTube More Updates

San Francisco: Proposition C Carries the Day in Court


Meanwhile, Advocates Advise San Francisco on Homelessness Funding

“The Court of Appeal Decision stands. Proposition C is valid.
WE WONNNNNNNNNNN!!!!!!!!”

That was the announcement I received via Facebook Messenger on Wednesday, September 8 about Prop. C taking effect.

After almost two years, the measure known as “Our City, Our Home” can now live up to the promise of its name, affirming that I’m part of a city committed to housing homeless people and keeping them housed.

In the November 2018 election, 61% of San Francisco voters approved of the City taxing wealthy corporations to fund homelessness programs, mental health and substance use treatment programs, and eviction defense efforts.

But an anti-tax group and big business associations filed a lawsuit against the City to prevent Proposition C from taking effect. They argued that Proposition C proponents needed a two-thirds super-majority, not a simple majority, to pass.

However, the City Attorney’s office maintained that a citizen-driven revenue measure only needs 50 percent plus 1. The San Francisco Superior Court and California Court of Appeal agreed, thus solidifying its electoral victory.

Now, almost a half-billion dollars that have been collected and sitting in escrow is now unlocked, more than doubling the amount of homeless expenditures — benefiting over 10,000 unhoused San Franciscans.

Proposition C

Under Proposition C, the funds will be disbursed this way:

  • 50% will go to housing
  • 25% to mental health and substance use services
  • 15% to rental assistance and eviction defense programs
  • 10% to emergency shelter and drop-in hygiene programs

An oversight committee will watch over how funds are spent.

Added to the $300 million San Francisco already dedicates to homeless services, this funding will go a long way in addressing this systemic problem — as well as challenges specific to the unhoused people who shared with me their stories, experiences, meals and shelter space.

That leads me to the beauty of the measure: the true experts on homelessness — unhoused folk themselves — were consulted in drafting that measure.

About 300 unhoused people were hired in phone banks, calling some 90,000 voters. Allies from health networks, community-based organizations, service providers and faith communities also joined our successful campaign.

Still, homeless advocates felt the need to remind the gravity of the situation to the public when Proposition C was in litigation. To that end, the Coalition on Homelessness again relied on unhoused people’s expertise when it conducted a needs assessment study.

Six hundred homeless and marginally housed people were surveyed and interviewed by a team of peer researchers — including myself — who share or have shared their lived experience. They provided input on what the new system would look after the influx of Proposition C funds and how it would work to prevent homelessness, as well as pave exits from homelessness.

Why did survey participants lose their housing?

Mostly, it was due to lack of affordability. The factors most reported behind their displacement were job loss and low incomes unable to keep pace with high rents. Rental assistance, if it were made available, would have kept them in their homes, one third of them responded.

Aid to tenants was just one of 102 policy recommendations spelled out in the study. Among others were:

  • Making housing case management available
  • Increased and enhanced permanent supportive housing
  • Fully implementing treatment on demand
  • Intensive case management for mental health clients
  • Developing alternatives to a police-centered approach to mental health
  • Gender-affirming services for transgender people

Significantly, the myth of “service resistance”, declining shelter and treatment in favor of street life, was debunked. When survey participants were asked about shelter, a majority said they preferred legal campsites with private tents, showers, bathrooms and basic security over the existing shelter system.

The impact of Proposition C will be wide-ranging, said study team members, from stress relief to reduced trauma to greater inclusion of marginalized communities.

Jazmin Frias, a peer researcher and focus group facilitator among Spanish speakers, noted that Proposition C would provide an ounce of prevention in the form of subsidies and tenant protections that’s worth a pound of housing stability cure.

“My life would change drastically under Prop. C,” she told project researchers. “It would give me and all of these families a great amount of peace to be able to have somewhere stable to go home to … not having to worry about if the police is going to remove you at three in the morning with all the children because we are parked on the side of the street. Our children will grow up with less traumas because parents will not be overworked to keep a stable home that leads for more family time and more happy memories.”

Another takeaway is housing as a form of harm reduction.

Half of the people who report a substance use issue remain untreated. This is largely because of such barriers to treatment as waitlists, lack of beds, difficulty in navigating the system and overly strict treatment rules.

In the report, Lisseth Sanchez of Mujeres Latinas en Accion pointed out the benefit of housing and treatment, especially to unhoused subpopulations in the transgender and Latinx communities, as well as other working in underground economies.

“One big impact of Prop. C would be lowering the use of substances because TransLatina women would have opportunities to be in things that actually benefit us,” Sanchez said. “How are you supposed to be OK if the night before you needed to exchange sex for a place to live or being up all night waiting for a client to pay for a motel so you can rest? What we need is opportunity.”

Peer researcher Ms. Earl also indicated in the study that the measure would partially act as a social corrective. Ms. Earl, who is a Black trans woman, said it would clear a path to housing for members of communities who have suffered injustice.

“Access and education are a big deal to my community,” she said. “There are lots of people who just don’t have access to services, housing or jobs because of their skin color, gender identity, criminal history or housing status. Prop. C is a way to rectify the systematic exclusion of people who daily face these oppressions.”

In their own way, the people I’ve interviewed, as a journalist or researcher, were performing a vital service: they were directing the City and County of San Francisco toward solutions. That reminds me of the adage about working with a specific group of people on an issue that affects them: “Nothing about us without us!”


TJ Johnston

TJ Johnston

  

San Francisco-based journalist. Work appears in Street Sheet, Street Spirit, as well as other publications. Homelessness is a human interest and human rights issue.

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